War Fortifications Woorim Beach

The Bribie Island Second World War Fortifications are heritage-listed fortifications at Woorim and Bribie Island North on Bribie IslandQueensland, Australia. They were built from 1939 to 1943 and were added to the Queensland Heritage Register on 20 July 1993

The Bribie Island Fortifications were constructed from 1939 to 1943 as part of the systems of defence of southeast Queensland during the Second World War, and to provide artillery training for Australian soldiers for overseas service. Other fortifications were also apparent throughout Moreton Bay during the war, at Caloundra and on Moreton Island at Cowan Cowan Point and Rous, which together with the existing installations at Fort Lytton, provided a coordinated series of defensive batteries for the region

Bribie Island was a popular holiday destination from the early twentieth century. Steamers from Brisbane docked at the jetty on the southwestern side of the island, and a road led across the island to the settlement of Woorim, the surfing beach of the island. The island supported a small community, and the permanent residents of the eastern side were relocated from their homes when the Australian Army began moving in to the island in 1939

Naval gun being ferried across to Bribie Island, 1939
http://By Item is held by John Oxley Library, State Library of Queensland., Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=26072494

Two six inch guns, surplus from the First World War, were transported across Pumicestone Passage from the mainland to form the Battery at the northern end of Bribie Island (26.8540°S 153.1292°E). The guns were originally installed on cruciform mountings, consisting of two steel members forming a cross upon which the gun was sited, which were found to be inadequate, for after firing the guns the pivot tilted quite dramatically

The Bribie Island Second World War Fortifications are located along the eastern shore of Bribie Island and consist of the remains of three groups; Fort Bribie on north Bribie Island, Skirmish Point Battery to the north of Woorim at south Bribie Island, and the Royal Australian Navy Station No.4 at the north end of Woorim.[1]

These groups are located facing the northwest channel, being the entrance to Moreton Bay from the Coral Sea/Pacific Ocean, and within sight of Moreton Island to the southeast and Caloundra to the north.[1]

Bribie Island is relatively flat and the northern end is affected by shifting dune formations and tidal erosion. As a result, some remaining structures do not have the same position in relation to the shoreline as they had when constructed

Sunrise at Bribie Island

Every morning an amazing sunrise on the ocean Beach at Woorim on Bribie Island. Yet, every morning the beach is deserted and only I see the sunrise from the sands.

https://sunrise.maplogs.com/woorim_qld_australia.423402.html

Bribie Island View from the Top

I walked along the sand but it was very windy, so I walked up the steps to the reserve between the Surf Club and the restaurants. The view below of the waters was beautiful

Woorim Foreshore is a dog free beach…with a sign clearly saying no dogs…and also no nude bathing. There were many people walking their dogs on the grassed areas. I diligently searched for a nude walking their dog on the beach but did not see any. This area can be booked for functions… Interesting…I did like the sand mats designed for wheelchairs. It made walking easier too. The blue-coloured matting allows people who use wheelchairs, motor scooters, walking frames or prams to access the beach and water. It runs from Bluey Piva Park (next to the Surf Club) down onto a patrolled beach with red and yellow flags and a surf lifesaving tower.

Here, you will find a toilet block with accessible facilities, water fountains, and plenty of shaded picnic tables and bench seats with beach views at Bluey Piva Park. Two beach wheelchairs are available for free hire from the Bribie Island Surf Lifesaving Club. These help users to travel across the sand and can be immersed in water. Beach access (Access Point 12) is well-signed, with minimal gradients and clear transport routes between the various buildings and facilities. https://www.accessible.visitmoretonbayregion.com.au/woorim-beach-bribie-island

The beach is patrolled by life guards who stand near the flags showing the area safe for patrolled swimming. Surf patrols on Ocean Beach, Woorim, started in 1923 by members of the Metropolitan Swimming Club of Brisbane; with the Bribie Island Surf Life Saving Club forming in 1933. From its humble beginnings of a few rooms on top of the dunes and an observation tower made from felled tree branches, the club has seen many changes. A new lookout tower has just finished construction…

Explore the intriguing and fascinating history of Bribie Island in a beautiful, contemporary museum. The Bribie Island Seaside Museum enjoys scenic views across the glimmering waters of the Pumicestone Passage and Moreton Bay. 

Morning at Bribie Island

Walk to the Beach in the morning

Its amazing how deserted the beach is in the early morning. Walking along I feel as if the beach is mine and mine alone as I do not share it even with a bird. Sometimes there is a walker that I see every morning, but mostly for the first hour it is just mine.

Today I slept in and still the beach was deserted in the morning…and it is the most beautiful time of the day at Sunrise

Not only did I sleep in, I also had a dead camera battery. Big choice, do I simply walk on or go back and collect the spare battery. I went back. When I returned I did not feel like the same walk so wandered through the few shops looking for breakfast and a coffee, but everything was still asleep. I found new shops that invited a visit when they were open and I found another entrance to the beach I walked on in the opposite direction…

Woorim is on the south-eastern corner of Bribie Island, bounded by the Coral Sea to the east and Moreton Bay to the south.[4] Bald Point is on the southern beach (27.0959°S 153.1950°E). Erosion of the beach at Woorim is an ongoing issue with long term recession trends of the shoreline observed. In September 2007 Caboolture Shire Council (now amalgamated into the Moreton Bay Regional Council) published a Shoreline Erosion Management Plan in response.

Woorim has a beach, a small shopping centre, and parklands adjoining the beach.

Bribie Island Golf Club at 5 Links Court (27.0822°S 153.2013°E) has an 18-hole par-72 course, a distance of 6,203 metres (20,351 ft)

Coochin Creek Camping Ground

Cochin Creek Camping Ground Mount Beerwah National Park

Coochin Creek camping area in Beerwah State Forest provides a camping area that is ideal for visitors who enjoy fishing and boating. You can reach the camping area by conventional vehicle. Camp sites are numbered and individual camp site details are provided so visitors can book a site most suitable for their tent, camper trailer, campervan or caravan. A terraced area provides vantage points for fishing from the creek bank. It is also possible to launch a canoe into the creek.

Beerburrum and Beerwah State Forests include exotic pine plantations, open eucalypt forest, rainforest and coastal wallum remnants. Short walks explore the forests and lead to spectacular views of the Glass House Mountains area. At Coochin Creek camping and day-use area, the mangrove-lined creek provides a great place for fishing and exploring the waterway in canoes and small boats. The creek flows into the sheltered waters of Pumicestone passage in Moreton Bay Marine Park, an area known for its excellent boating and fishing opportunities. From the nearby creek bank, cast in your line in for bream, flathead and mangrove jack. Launch your canoe or kayak, or, if you have a small boat, launch from the boat ramp one kilometre upstream.

The Beerburrum and Beerwah State forests are within an ‘inter-urban break’—a 63,000-hectare area of mainly agricultural and forested landscapes, including a large proportion of public land which is mostly national park or State forest. The Inter-urban Break Outdoor Recreation Plan provides public land managers with a guide to work together to protect the natural beauty of the landscape while supporting a range of recreational opportunities in suitable locations.

The area is a protected and Domestic animals are not permitted at the camping area or adjoining day-use area. Many birds are animals live in this area.

Check park alerts for the latest information on access, closures and conditions.Coochin Creek camping area. Photo: Queensland Government.

Coochin Creek camping area.

Bribie Island

Pre Sunrise at Bribie Island

Bribie Island is the smallest and most northerly of three major sand islands forming the coastline sheltering the northern part of Moreton Bay, Queensland, Australia. The others are Moreton Island and North Stradbroke Island. Bribie Island is 34 kilometres long, and 8 kilometres at its widest.. It is believed that the name of the island came from a corruption of a mainland word for it, Boorabee.[2] meaning ‘koala’.

Most of the island is uninhabited national park (55.8 square kilometres or 21.5 square miles) and forestry plantations. The southern end of the island has been intensively urbanised as part of the Moreton Bay Region, the main suburbs being BongareeWoorimBellara and Banksia Beach. A bridge from Sandstone Point on the mainland was completed in 1963.

The name Woorim may be derived from the Kabi language word wurama meaning red backed sea eagle.

WW2 Bunker ….if you don’t own a 4WD you can walk from Woorim Beach to the fort, but be warned, the long, sandy trek of approximately 20km is not for the faint of heart. You could also park at the northern end of White Patch Esplanade and hike through the national park .

The first Bunker is approximately 2 kms from Woorim Surf Club and easy to walk to…It is currently closed to the public and only accessible from the beach. The Bribie Island Fortifications were constructed from 1939 to 1943 as part of the systems of defence of southeast Queensland during the Second World War, and to provide artillery training for Australian soldiers for overseas service. Other fortifications were also apparent throughout Moreton Bay during the war, at Caloundra and on Moreton Island at Cowan Cowan Point and Rous, which together with the existing installations at Fort Lytton, provided a coordinated series of defensive batteries for the region

Moreton Bay Wetlands

Mangroves Australia

Russell Island Ooncooncoon Bay at Low tide

Moreton Bay Marine Park protects a vast array of marine habitats, plants and animals. Covering more than 3400km2of open and sheltered waterways and dotted with islands, Moreton Bay Marine Park includes some of Australia’s premier wetlands. Extensive mangroves and tidal flats support and shelter fish, birds and other wildlife. Sandflats provide roosting sites for migratory birds and seagrass beds nurture fish, shellfish, dugong and turtles.

Moreton Bay Wetlands

In 1971, in the Iranian city of Ramsar, representatives from 18 nations signed the Convention on Wetlands of International Significance (known as the Ramsar Convention) to stop global loss of wetlands, and to conserve and sustainably manage remaining wetlands. Moreton Bay is one of Australia’s largest sites listed under the Ramsar Convention.

The wetlands of Moreton Bay are extremely varied and range from perched freshwater lakes and sedge swamps on the offshore islands…

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Stradbroke Island Tour

We were met at Dunwich Ferry by Stradbroke Island Kingfisher Tours and in the 4WD vehicle we went on the day tour. We drove through Dunwich and then went on the Brown Lake Road towards Brown Lake.

A natural perched lake, pure rainwater tinged brown by the native teatrees, Brown Lake, or Lake Bummiera, is a hidden treasure. There are barbecue and picnic facilities and easy road access just 3.5kms outside Dunwich. Popular swimming place and picnic spot. The lake is visible from the carpark. The calm tranquility of the lake is entrancing, especially if you visit in the early morning or late afternoon. In spring, wildflowers dot the surrounding bushland. Lake Bummiera has special significance to the local Aboriginal people, and if you visit at a quiet time of day you’ll feel the magic

One of the 2 largest and most sacred lakes on the island. Both Kaboora and Bummiera are acknowledged as being the home of an extraordinarily huge carpet snake. It’s spirit resides in both lakes with the jargon attributed with being able to travel from one lake to another. The old Quandamooka people cautioned those that swam and skied on the lakes, so sacred were these lakes that old people would not approach them without a special acknowledgement

Then we drove to Main Beach for a drive on the sand to Point Lookout where we had lunch and a look from the surf club before driving on the sand to the Gorge.

Finally we went looing for a Koala and then drove on the sand to Amity Point before returning to Dunwich for the ferry back to Cleveland.

Brown Lake Stradbroke Island

A natural perched lake, pure rainwater tinged brown by the native teatrees, Brown Lake, or Lake Bummiera, is a hidden treasure. The lake itself is a prominent part of the landscape for the people of Quandamooka, particularly the Dandrubin-Gorenpul and Noonucal Aboriginal groups. They associate Brown Lake with women and children, where only women are allowed to speak for the natural wonder and are responsible by law to care for and manage the lake and its resources. Brown Lake is one of the two largest and most culturally significant lakes on Stradbroke Island (it’s also known as Bummiera, alongside its counterpart, Kaboora). It’s thought to be home to a large spirit snake referred to as Yuri Kabool. The spirit snake is said to be able to travel from one lake to the other without any hindrance

Legend has it that the Quandamooka people warned against visitors swimming in the lake without approval from the elders as the natural pools of water needed to be approached with special acknowledgement beforehand. Elders would sing out before visitors got too close to the waters and made them stand back to wait for a sign that they could approach – usually, this signal came in the form of calm waters.

To the local community, this ritual of stopping, singing out, and waiting for a sign became common practice when approaching either of the two largest lakes on Stradbroke Island, including Brown Lake, in order to show respect for Yuri Kaboo, the spirit snake.

Today, the lake is still imbued with a fascinating cultural history that spans generations, but it is also a popular hotspot for visitors looking for the perfect place to picnic or soak up the spectacular scenery that this part of Australia has to offer. The picturesque backdrop that surrounds the lake lends itself perfectly to a day spent kicking back, relaxing, and enjoying some fresh food. After that, you can explore the native bushlands and the other popular attractions on North Stradbroke Island

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