Point Danger NSW

Point Danger Lookout NSW

Situated on the New South Wales/Queensland border, high on a peak overlooking Duranbah Beach which is popular for surfing. Point Danger was named by Captain James Cook on his 1770 journey up the east coast of Australia to warn later mariners of dangerous coral reefs off this treacherous coast. From Point Danger, you will often see dolphins out to sea, and on a fine day there are views from Surfers Paradise to Byron Bay… we saw a single whale today sighted by the bus driver Henry.

The tour bus stopped here for about 20 minutes long enough to walk the track and look across the River Tweed to the bridge at Fingal Point and enjoy the glorious view. Point Danger was named by Captain James Cook on his 1770 journey up the east coast of Australia to warn later mariners of dangerous coral reefs off this treacherous coast. From an historic point of view this place is brimming with interesting facts about Australian maritime history. In 1895, the Danger Point Lighthouse was built, providing more security for the ships in these dangerous waters. A lighthouse commission of 1890 stressed the need for a light at Danger Point and in May 1892 engineer W T Douglass submitted a report on a lighthouse at Danger Point.

Point Danger Light, also known as the Captain Cook Memorial Light, is an active lighthouse located on Point Danger, a headland between Coolangatta and Tweed Heads, marking the border between Queensland and New South WalesAustralia. It lays claim to be the first lighthouse in the world to experiment with laser as a light source. The original light source was an experimental laser-based light,  and the lighthouse may very well be the first in the world to experiment with this light source. However, the experiment failed, and the light source was replaced in 1975 by a regular electric lamp.

Corroboree Park

Low tide evening at Corroboree Point Macleay island

An 1865 map shows subdivision on Macleay Island allowing for roads, wharves and reserves for aboriginal sites, including Corroboree Point. Well known as an
important Aboriginal site right from beginning, Corroboree Point was camp of oysterman Thomas Lucas. In 1863 he acquired No 16 lease under Oyster Act of 1863.

Corroboree Point, Lions Park is the site of an Aboriginal midden and was possibly an Aboriginal ceremonial ground and dreaming site. There was a European oyster lease there and it was the site of Thomas Lucas’ oyster camp. file:///C:/Users/Maggi/Documents/Macleay%20Island%20History/South_Moreton_Bay_Island_Timelines.pdf

Adjacent to Corroboree Park is Cotton Tree Bushcare Site. The freshwater dam was created by the early farmers, from a waterhole that had been used for thousands of years by local Aboriginals. The area, including nearby Corroboree Park, is particularly significant to the Quandamooka people even today. Early white settlers grew melons in the good soil, watering them from the dam. Many birds are attracted to this permanent water source, so the site is a good spot for quiet bird-watching.

Cotton Tree Avenue Bushcare Site

The vegetation consists of a beautiful paperbark (melaleuca quinquenervia) stand around the waterhole, an area of reeds and rushes, she-oaks (casuarina glauca), and various large old eucalypts and other natives in the drier parts.

The Bushcare group commenced work on the site in February 2003. The waterhole had been used as a rubbish dump by Islanders in the past, and many trips to the tip were necessary in the early days. We then concentrated on the area along Boat Harbour Avenue. The slope by the road edge is particularly poor soil and we have removed weeds, re-planted with casuarina torulosa, and spread mulch. Casuarina torulosa is a good pioneer plant and the food tree for the rare glossy black cockatoo. In September 2006, we planted out an area on Boat Harbour Avenue that the Council had filled. This had two deep, steep-sided holes created when the Council removed soil many years ago. Appropriate plants were used in this often-wet spot, and weed mat was laid to prevent erosion and weed infestation. In 2013, the Cotton Tree Bushcarers received an award for “ten years of valuable contributions to Redland City Council’s Bushcare Programme

Grey Mangroves … Avicennia marina

Grey Mangroves

It is the most common and widespread mangrove found along the mainland coast of Australia. It is the only mangrove species able to withstand the cooler climates of South Australia and Victoria. Grey mangrove occurs in intertidal zones on a range of soft muds to sandy soils. Two key adaptations they have are the ability to survive in waterlogged and anoxic (no oxygen) soil, and the ability to tolerate brackish waters. Some mangroves remove salt from brackish estuarine waters through ultra-filtration in their roots

The grey mangrove or avicennia is capable of living in extremely saline conditions and is thus labelled a halophyte. Numerous adaptations have been utilised that enable the grey mangrove to tolerate the saline water and the anaerobic soil found in the estuaries in which they inhabit. They excrete excess salt through their long thick leaves, and absorb oxygen through their aerial root system. Also known as white mangrove, it occurs in saltwater swamps and estuaries in coastal NSW national parks. These trees can tolerate extremely salty water by excreting excess salt through their large thick leaves

Grey Mangroves line the river

Grey mangrove is the most common and widespread mangrove found within intertidal zones across Australia, and throughout the world. Growing to a height of 3-10m, they thrive best in estuaries with a mix of fresh and salt water. They excrete excess salt through their long thick leaves, and absorb oxygen through their aerial root system.

Also known as white mangrove, it occurs in saltwater swamps and estuaries in coastal NSW national parks. These trees can tolerate extremely salty water by excreting excess salt through their large thick leaves. However, grey mangrove thrives best in brackish waters – a mix of salt and fresh water.

Grey mangrove grows as a small shrub or tree to 3-10m, with a sprawling mass of branches. It often flowers all year long, producing yellow fruit that easily self-seed. The mangrove’s unique aerial root system extends above the waterline, allowing it to absorb oxygen.

Marguerite Carstairs

These mangroves were around Tweed Heads NSW. We did an eco-tour from Tweed Heads to Stotts Reserve in Murwillumba and back. Tweed River and Rainforest Lunch Cruise on the Tweed River and relax into the surrounding nature and scenery. The Stotts Island Nature Reserve is a protected nature reserve containing the Stotts Island, a river island, that is located in the Tweed River, in the Northern Rivers region of New South Wales in eastern Australia. The 141-hectare (350-acre) reserve is situated near Tweed Heads and 12 kilometres (7.5 mi) northeast of Murwillumbahhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stotts_Island_Nature_Reserve

Stotts Island is composed of alluvium deposited from the Pleistocene to the present. It is prone to flooding, during which times silt and weed material accumulate on the island. The island is continuously being reshaped by erosion. The reserve contains an intact 77-hectare (190-acre) segment of lowland sub-tropical rainforest.

Mangroves Australia

Grey Mangroves

It is the most common and widespread mangrove found along the mainland coast of Australia. It is the only mangrove species able to withstand the cooler climates of South Australia and Victoria. Grey mangrove occurs in intertidal zones on a range of soft muds to sandy soils. Two key adaptations they have are the ability to survive in waterlogged and anoxic (no oxygen) soil, and the ability to tolerate brackish waters. Some mangroves remove salt from brackish estuarine waters through ultra-filtration in their roots

The grey mangrove or avicennia is capable of living in extremely saline conditions and is thus labelled a halophyte. Numerous adaptations have been utilised that enable the grey mangrove to tolerate the saline water and the anaerobic soil found in the estuaries in which they inhabit. They excrete excess salt through their long thick leaves, and absorb oxygen through their aerial…

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Slipping Sands and Jumpinpin Bar Stradbroke Island

Jumpinpin Bar is located between North and South Stradbroke Island and was created literally by the dynamiting of the ship Cambus Wallace and the tides and winds. It is a sandy cove safe for swimming, boating and sand walking

Slipping Sands and Jumpinpin Bar Stradbroke Island

Burrum Heads Queensland

Burrum Heads is located about three and a half hours drive north of Brisbane and approximately half an hour from Hervey Bay and Maryborough, 50 kms from Maryborough. I lived in Burrum Heads 10 years ago, so decided to book into the Burrum Heads Caravan Park in Hillcrest Avenue and visit my old haunts. The Caravan […]

Burrum Heads Queensland

Muddy Water

Lately, vast areas of Queensland have been covered in brown water. The dust from our recent western trip is still on our tyres, but many of the roads we drove on are now cut by floods. The Cunningham Highway and the border rivers areas went under last week: Warwick, Stanthorpe, Texas, Yelarbon. Inglewood was inundated […]

Muddy Water

Myora Springs Stradbroke Island

Myora Springs Stradbroke Island

Myora Springs, sometimes also referred to as Moongalba (sitting down place), is a place to be explored and enjoyed peacefully. Erosion and vegetation loss, including the particularly valuable mangroves, was becoming a big problem in the early 2010s, before a raised walkway and viewing platform was installed. Take a slow walk through the area, tuning your senses to the sights, sounds and smells of the forest. Enjoy the wildlife and read up on the local area through informative signage. A rare breed of mammal, the false water rat, was thought to be extinct until it was discovered living here in 1978.

North Stradbroke Island, known as Minjerribah by its custodial owners, has a rich history stretching back at least 25,000 years of inhabitation by the Quandamooka people. With its fresh water and teeming wildlife it is no surprise to learn Myora Springs was a favoured camping place of the local people. The banks feature parts of large middens, which contain, among other things, cockle, oyster and whelk shells.

https://www.visitbrisbane.com.au/information/articles/activities/myora-springs-minjerribah?sc_lang=en-au

Yura Tours…will be happy to take you to the Springs and tell you about her experiences at the Springs as a child. She told of how when the tide was in the Springs were half hot and half cold because of the icy spring water

Stradbroke Mangroves

Mangroves at Stradbroke..Myora Springs

Mangroves Australia

Myora Springs Mangroves

Myora Springs has fresh water coming from inland. It also has tidal sea water coming in when the tide is high. The mangroves here are on the side of the sea water.

The mangroves are quite small and have spreading roots. This area may have people walking and boat activity so the mangroves may not grow as densely as in other places. The area also gets fresh water from the Spring as well as 2 tidal incoming water each day.

Mangroves have traditionally been used by Indigenous Australians as sources of food, including mangrove fruit, mud crabs, clams and fish such as barramundi. Mangrove timber has traditionally been used to make canoes, paddles and weapons such as shields, spears and boomerangs. Because mangroves are flowering plants, the flowers are a likely source for honey; native bees are found in the mangroves during the various flowering seasons…

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Walking the Gorge at Lookout Point

Gorge at Point Lookout Stradbroke Island

The Rain stopped and we took the bus to Lookout Point where the Gorge walk is located. We walked down to the Blow hole point and stayed there for a while trying to see the blowout. The Gorge Walk has a unique rock formation called the ‘Blow Hole’, similar to that of a humpback whale.  It was a beautiful day for walking the Gorge. North Stradbroke Island’s impressive headland walk North Gorge Walk is an absolute must do. The 1.2 kilometre boardwalk follows the headland of Point Lookout offering views which are simply breath-taking.

Straddie’s impressive headland walk called the North Gorge walk is located at the north western end of Point Lookout and is the best vantage point on the island to watch the whales and marine life pass right before your eyes.
The walk encompasses the best of both worlds, with its raw and jagged headland to one side, and natural bushland on the other. Known for its best viewing experience of migrating humpback whales, the Gorge Walk also has a unique rock formation called the ‘Blow Hole’, similar to that of a humpback whale.

The next stop was at the peak where the main viewing area is for the migrating whales. This is where in whale season, tourists gather and watch the whales.

Gorge walk

The Gorge walk at Point Lookout is a must for all visitors to the island. This gentle walk offers outstanding views across the ocean and is an ideal vantage point for spotting marine life, such as turtles, dolphins and manta rays. From June to November, visitors can delight in watching humpback whales pass close to the coastline on their annual migration. The Gorge walk also offers stunning views along beautiful Main Beach to Jumpinpin, the island’s southern tip. North Stradbroke Island map (PDF, 669KB)

After staying for a while at the viewing place, the track climbs to the final part of the walk as it ends at the Point Lookout shops. Here we met two older guys who said they saw a whale out on the horizon but its not whale time right now. This area at sunrise and sunset is where the wallabies graze and when the water is clear, you can see dolphins and turtles at play.

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