Red Sunrise at Tin Can Bay

Tin Can Bay did not disappoint me. I got the most beautiful sunrise that covered the bay with color, that filled the water, and that reflected onto the shore and the surroundings. I ran from spot to spot taking photos and smiling to myself. I am so happy when I am surrounded by a sunrise.

Why do Sunsets and sunrises make us feel so happy? We feel this happiness because we are part of the vast and integral system called nature … and everything about nature causes positive feelings within us 

Another answer at Quora…..

Philosophically, each of these events signifies the end and the beginning of something that should reach its ultimate destination. A new day starts with the sunrise which signifies newer opportunities in life and a chance to do better. The end of a trying day tells you that there’s more to it; even if the day wasn’t as good, it is going to end ultimately. Both are satisfying for the eyes and the heart- in ways only the observer can tell.

Met a dog called Maggie

I went to say Hello to a lady I met by the Marina as she was living at Russell Island before they moved to Tin Can Bay. When I told her my name was Maggi, they laughed as that is the name of their dog. She also told me that they met a man the day before who had the same name as their other dog. I am sure both he and I had our names long before the doggies were even born. Anyway… Here is Maggie….and as you can see, she is happy and friendly and loves meeting people.

It must have been my day for meeting dogs and their owners. I walked down to the Marina and there was a dog also looking at the sunrise. I took a photo and smiled at its owner and said I think your dog likes me. His reply…My dog likes anyone who would give her a pat….Smile!!

Sunset and Sunrise at Tin Can Bay

Sunset at Tin Can Bay Marina

I went to Tin Can Bay Marina wanting to have dinner there, and looked at the Restaurant and loved it. The I decided to just go home to the Caravan Park after the sunset, and that is what I did. I walked around the Marina and the fishing boats and loved the evening.

The next morning the sunrise was beautiful. There were lots of people walking on the grass and the track all happy to say ‘Good morning’ and share a smile. A man called to his dog and the dog ignored him. I said something and the man grinned and said his dog was like a woman, she would sniff, lick, walk off and not listen to a thing he said. Another man I walked with for a while said, he came to Tin Can Bay five years ago for a visit and never left. I remembered speaking with him a few years ago. His face is very memorable. It sure is a small world.

I walked down the street to the boats to see the dolphins but they were not there. There was a generous crowd of excited children all waiting for the dolphins too. It was too busy to get a breakfast and the café was not open. I walked back along the marina and went back to the Caravan for toast and tea and talked to a few birds.

Tin Can Bay Queensland

Sunset at Tin Can Bay Marina

I booked into Kingfisher Caravan Park because I always stay there. I discovered the caravan Park was now run by the original owner’s sister and I missed the old faces. However, change was apparent. The grounds were beautifully maintained with colourful plants and the sites were carefully allocated in specific areas with cement blocks, and I was lucky enough to get a tree, and a friendly neighbor, who helped me set up my van and my annex, so I was very happy.

I went walking to see the sunset with my new friend and we walked down past the Tin Can Bay Marina following a bird walk track and discovered the best viewing for a sunset was the Marina itself.

The best view for the sunrise was the Bay opposite the Caravan Park, so that’s where I headed at Dawn and I was not disappointed. The sunset was as usual, magnificent and I walked the length of the walking track taking photos and saying good morning to other walkers with their dogs also doing the morning round.

Camping at Rainbow Beach

Fisherman at Rainbow Beach

Rainbow Beach is situated right on the edge of the Great Sandy National Park which includes Cooloola, Inskip and Fraser Island Recreation Areas. https://parks.des.qld.gov.au/ Camping is $6.50 a night and you need to get a camping permit from National Parks to stay overnight. Day trips are free. There are different camping areas at Inskip, and you need to make sure you are booked into the correct camping ground. I drive a 2WD so I needed a camp with 2WD access. There is one only…and that is at Dorrigo. There are toilet blocks every 50 meters or so with a sink and tap for washing hands, and huge industrial rubbish bins are at the exit for placing your rubbish and recyclables. The sand is very soft, and the paths are covered with bark for easy driving, but go off track and you get bogged in the soft sand.

Those with 4WD vehicles have access to camping on the dunes adjacent to the beach and water with views of the sunrise. 4Wd vehicles drive along the sand beside the water, and there were children, water craft and fishermen fishing along the surf or out at sea in their motor boats. Weekends had this area literally full of campers but came Sunday night and almost all vanished leaving me behind for a week of perfect peace and quiet with just a few other mostly older nomads in their caravans with little dogs and quiet wives who seemed to come out at night to sit by their campfire and cook the daily catch. There were birds but mostly in the trees or on the sand when a fisherman was around and the odd backpacker was frowned at by the older nomads who had no idea where they came from. The beach was mostly deserted as the older nomads tended to stay in their caravans under their little awnings to keep out the sun and complain about the weekend crowd who were noisy and lively.

I chose to move on when the weekend was due and booked into a caravan Park at Tin Can Bay. Much as I loved camping at Rainbow Beach, I missed having a shower and water to wash in, and my precious drinking water was now running low and the surf was a long walk away from the camping area with the low tides.

Rainbow Beach…Inskip

Walking track to Rainbow Beach

Rainbow Beach is a coastal rural town and locality in the Gympie Region, Queensland, Australia. In the 2016 census, Rainbow Beach had a population of 1,249 people. It is a popular tourist destination, both in its own right and as a gateway to Fraser Island. When I go to Rainbow Beach I usually stay at Inskip Point and camp in the National Park right next to the beach and the water. Inskip is a peninsula that separates the Wide Bay and Tin Can Inlet from the Coral Sea. At its northernmost point (known as Inskip Point), Inskip is 1.2 kilometres (0.75 mi) from Fraser Island, making it a major gateway to the island via vehicular barges. There are camping grounds in Inskip and two boat ramps, horse trails and other outdoor recreational facilities

In 2011, a large sinkhole consumed much of the beach at Inskip Point, with the hole size estimated at 100 m+ long and 50 m+ deep. A large sinkhole opened up near Queensland’s Rainbow Beach, affecting campers along Inskip Point in September 2015.  Fishermen were the first to notice the shoreline quickly receding into the ocean around 10:30 pm, the Brisbane Times reports. Casey Hughes told ABC news it sounded like thunder as the sinkhole was opening. The sinkhole was 150 metres long, 50 metres wide and three metres deep. The sinkhole swallowed up one car, a caravan, a camper trailer and several tents. 140 people were evacuated from the campground, but no injuries were reported. Most of the campers were able to move their vehicles out of harm’s way before their campsites were submerged in water.

The town’s name derives from the rainbow-coloured sand dunes surrounding the settlement. According to the legends of the Kabi people, the dunes were coloured when Yiningie, a spirit represented by a rainbow, plunged into the cliffs after doing battle with an evil tribesman.  Much of the sand colours stem from the rich content of minerals in the sand, such as rutileilmenitezircon, and monazite. A black dune of ilmenite sands, overgrown by dune vegetation, can be found north west of the main town. This is currently being removed for sale in China with complete removal expected to take two years.

The Cooloola Section of the Great Sandy National Park borders the town to the south. A number of walking tracks through the national park depart from the southern outskirts of Rainbow Beach

The town’s economy is now dominated by tourism, featuring quiet and idyllic holidays, fishing and retirement getaway. The town caters to beach-orientated holiday-makers with hotels, motels, and caravan parks. The town promotes itself as the “Gateway to Fraser Island” as vehicular ferries for Fraser Island depart from Inskip Point, north of town. Double Island Point, a popular destination amongst 4WD enthusiasts, is located east of town. It is also promoted as an eco-tourism destination.

Although it has a permanent population of about 1,000, about 70,000 visitors come to the town each year

Panorama Inskip at Rainbow Beach

Gympie Six Mile Rest Area…Queensland

Six Mile Rest Area Gympie

Every time I drive north. I almost always overnight-stay at the Gympie Six Mile Rest Area. I like the setting, the toilets and the distance from Brisbane…and if you can handle the noise from the trucks at night, it is a pleasant stay. The Caltex station before here provides a meal. I usually get petrol at Kybong which is 10 kms before Gympie, but with the new highway, it is now off track and suffering badly from a lack of trade. I called them on the phone and went back to get petrol and also a meal from the 24 hour diner which is open. I was told I could stay there overnight, but chose to return to Six mile Creek.

Beerwah Mountain Queensland

Mount Beerwah is the highest of the ten volcanic plugs in the Glass House Mountains range, 22 km north of Caboolture in South East QueenslandAustralia. It was formed 26 million years ago during the Oligocene Epoch of the Paleogene Period. Geologists estimate it may have been three times the height before it was eroded to a volcanic plug.

Mount Beerwah has two peaks, the taller of which is 556 metres (1,824 ft) high. It is one of the most visually prominent mountains in south-east Queensland. The first European settlers to ascend the peak was Andrew Petrie with his son John Petrie.  Its name comes from the Dungidau language words “birra, or “sky,” and “wandum,” “climbing up.”

In the traditional Aboriginal story of the region, Mount Beerwah is the pregnant mother and Mount Tibrogargan the father of all the other mountains in the area. Local Aboriginal people consider the mountains sacred.

The mountain is basically a column of trachyte. One side features a dramatic, inward leaning cliff face known as the Organ Pipes.  At its base is a number of small caves.

We drove to the Glasshouse Mountain Lookout and then walked around the mountain along a track that is being created and upgraded. Its a 20 minute 1 km walk through the bush and through ferneries and areas planted with natural bush. Steps and gradings make the walk easy but the end climbs up back to the lookout and that is quite steep. The views from the summit of Mount Beerwah are very rewarding. There is a 2.6 km trail up from a state government maintained parking lot. Start of the trail is a “level 5 difficulty” walk that turns into a climb that can be done without equipment with steps.

Mount Beerwah summit trail was controversially closed to climbing from 2009 – 2016, due to rock instability from bush fire. The Sunshine Coast Regional Council spent $400,000 on removing dangerous rocks and improving warning signs.

As at 2019, Mount Beerwah along with Mount Tibrogargan, Ngungun and the rest of the mountains with tracks remain open with maintained walking trails with the exception of Mount Coonowrin (which was permanently closed to public access in March 1999 due to the high risk of rock falls that had previously killed and injured climbers)

Glasshouse Mountains

Glasshouse Mountains

The Glass House Mountains are a cluster of thirteen hills that rise abruptly from the coastal plain on the Sunshine CoastQueenslandAustralia. The highest hill is Mount Beerwah at 556 metres above sea level, but the most identifiable of all the hills is Mount Tibrogargan which from certain angles bears a resemblance to a face staring east towards the ocean. The Volcanic peaks of the Glass House Mountains rise dramatically from the surrounding Sunshine Coast landscape. They were formed by intrusive plugs, remnants of volcanic activity that occurred 26-27 million years ago. Molten rock filled small vents or intruded as bodies beneath the surface and solidified into land rocks

The names of each mountain in the range are:

Mount Beerburrum, 278 m
Mount Beerwah, 556 m
Mount Coochin or The Coochin Hills, 235 m and 230 m
Mount Coonowrin or Crookneck or Fakebig, 377 m
Mount Elimbah or The Saddleback, 109 m
Mount Ngungun, 253 m
Mount Tibberoowuccum, 220 m
Mount Tibrogargan and Cooee, 364 m and 177 m
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