Historic Homes of Brisbane …Eastbourne House

EastbourneA WWII bunker in its backyard

Eastbourne

Built in 1900, Eastbourne was owned by a banker, William Villiers Browne, who lent his name to the street where the house stands. The house has distinctive early-20th century detailing in its timber floors, decorative ceilings, cornices, archways and breezeways. Some refurbishments were made in the 1930s, including the unusual addition of a WWII bomb shelter in its backyard. https://newfarmnews.com.au/eight-of-new-farms-heritage-houses-revisited/

Credit: realestate.com.au

Today, the spacious two-storey property spans 754 square metres and still has its dual street frontage. It was last sold for $2.3 million, in September 2016. https://newfarmnews.com.au/eight-of-new-farms-heritage-houses-revisited/

From 1885 to 1897 New Farm’s transport needs were met by horse-drawn trams, which operated along Brunswick Street, as far as Barker Street. In 1897, the horse trams were replaced with electric trams and the line was extended, with trams ultimately running as far as Macquarie Street and down to the river at New Farm Park. The electric trams ceased operation on 13 April 1969. Since then the suburb has been served by diesel buses.

New Farm developed a reputation in the late 1980s for street prostitution[14] and as a drug-addled, low-rent culture depicted in Andrew McGahan‘s grunge novel Praise, which is set largely in the suburb.

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