Full Moons… 2019

April Full Moon..the Egg Moon,,19 April 2019

The full moon is the lunar phase when the Moon appears fully illuminated from Earth‘s perspective. This occurs when Earth is located between the Sun and the Moon (more exactly, when the ecliptic longitudes of the Sun and Moon differ by 180°). This means that the lunar hemisphere facing Earth – the near side – is completely sunlit and appears as a circular disk, while the far side is dark. The full moon occurs once roughly every month.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Full_moon

March Full Moon 21 March 2019

A full moon is often thought of as an event of a full night’s duration. This is somewhat misleading because its phase seen from Earth continuously waxes or wanes (though much too slowly to notice in real time with the naked eye). Its maximum illumination occurs at the moment waxing has stopped. For any given location, about half of these maximum full moons may be visible, while the other half occurs during the day, when the full moon is below the horizon.

Many almanacs list full moons not only by date, but also by their exact time, usually in Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). Typical monthly calendars that include lunar phases may be offset by one day when used in a different time zone.

Full moon is generally a suboptimal time for astronomical observation of the Moon because shadows vanish. It is a poor time for other observations because the bright sunlight reflected by the Moon, amplified by the opposition surge, then outshines many stars.

February Full Moon….18 February 2019

Full moons are traditionally associated with temporal insomnia (inability to sleep), insanity (hence the terms lunacy and lunatic) and various “magical phenomena” such as lycanthropy. Psychologists, however, have found that there is no strong evidence for effects on human behavior around the time of a full moon.[11] They find that studies are generally not consistent, with some showing a positive effect and others showing a negative effect. In one instance, the 23 December 2000 issue of the British Medical Journal published two studies on dog bite admission to hospitals in England and Australia. The study of the Bradford Royal Infirmary found that dog bites were twice as common during a full moon, whereas the study conducted by the public hospitals in Australia found that they were less likely.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Full_moon

January Full Moon…18 January 2019

Some full moons have developed new names in modern times, e.g., the blue moon, and the names “harvest moon” and “hunter’s moon” for the full moons of autumn.

Lunar eclipses only happen during a full moon and often cast a seemingly reddish tint over the face of the moon. This has been called a blood moon in popular culture.
All full moons rise around the time of sunset. Because the moon moves eastward among the stars faster than the sun, its meridian passage is delayed, causing it to rise later each day – on average by about 50.47 minutes.[20] The harvest moon and hunter’s moon are unique because the time difference between moonrises on successive evenings is much shorter than average. The moon rises approximately 30 minutes later from one night to the next, as seen from about 40 degrees N or S latitude. (This is because a full moon in September appears to move not straight east but north-east in the sky.) Thus, there is no long period of darkness between sunset and moonrise for several days after the full moon,
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Full_moon

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