Mt Warning NSW

Mt Warning…

The Origin of Mount Warning Name

Originally referred to by the name Wollumbin by the local Aboriginal community, the name Mount Warning was bestowed on in by the legendary British explorer Lieutenant James Cook on the 16th of May 1770.

While commandeering his vessel, the HM Bark Endeavour, northwards, Cook was forced to change course and head East because of the dangerous reefs around the region known as Fingal Head, now renamed to Danger Reefs.

According to his own personal recording, he notes of seeing a sharp peaked mountain lying inland from a point he named Cape Byron. The next morning after he had successfully crossed the 3 mile long reef, he recorded of this encounter. He says that these reefs are laying at latitude 28..8′ and stretch two leagues East.

His recording continues to say that, from a point where there is a small island, there lays a situation by the peaked mountain, and for this reason he has named it Mount Warning to indicate the danger posed by the offshore reefs. http://www.mtwarning.net/

https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/visit-a-park/parks/wollumbin-national-park

Wollumbin National Park, formerly known as Mount Warning National Park, is a great place for a picnic or a day walk through World Heritage-listed rainforest.

Wollumbin, which dramatically rises from World Heritage-listed Wollumbin National Park to a height of 1,157m above sea level, is a remnant central vent of an ancient volcano. Formerly known as Mount Warning, this spectacular peak can be viewed from a range of vantage points in the surrounding massive crater (caldera), including Cudgen Nature Reserve, Border Ranges National Park and Nightcap National Park, Cape Byron Lighthouse and various settlements.

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