Sunrise Today...
Cleveand jetty 1871
Redland Bay

https://www.redland.qld.gov.au/info/20146/historic_people_and_places/202/historic_jetties

Russell Island Jetty
Russell Island

The Redlands has had many jetties. The first one was built in the 1820s on North Stradbroke Island.

Many were private jetties built by people whose land went down to the sea. Some were built by the Shire Council with a swimming enclosure on the end. Many Redlanders learnt to swim in these enclosures. Other jetties were built by the Queensland Government for ships, ferries and other boats.

Some jetties were simple wood platforms that were barely above the water at high tide. Other jetties were built of concrete and steel and were big enough for passenger ferries.

wellington Point
Wellington Point

The Wellington Point jetty was first built about 1937 in the same place as the present jetty. It has been renovated and repaired since then. It was mainly used by visitors to Wellington Point, which was a popular camping spot especially
during school holidays.

The first jetty built in the Redlands was at Dunwich on North Stradbroke Island. A 100-metre causeway was built out of rocks in about 1827-28. It was built by convicts living on the island.

harold-walker-jetty-dunwich-21-jan-15
Harold Walker Jetty Dunwich

Many more jetties were built all over the Redlands in the next 150 years, including:

  • Redland Bay jetty
  • South Street jetty
  • Black’s jetty
  • Oyster Point jetty
  • Wellington Point jetty
  • Paxton Street jetty
  • Victoria Point jetty
  • Amity Point jetties
Jetty
Russell Island Jetty 1886

Redland Bay was a long way from the railway line, which ended at Cleveland. Therefore boats were very important for the farmers who needed to get their produce (crops) to market. Redland Bayhas had several jetties built by either the Shire Council or the State
Government, and some farmers had their own jetties as well. It is not known exactly when the Redland Bay public jetty was first built.
By the 1898 the main jetty was worn out so the boats used another jetty just below the Redland Bay Hotel. In 1907 a new jetty was built on the site of the present Redland Bay jetty.

redland Bay hotel
Redland Bay Hotel and Jetty..1907

The 1866 jetty also got damaged by the weather, and in 1887 the Queensland Government built another timber jetty off the other
(western) side of the Point. The 1887 jetty replaced the 1866 jetty
as the main one used by the coastal steamers. This jetty lasted
longer because it was more sheltered on that side of the Point.
However, it also wore out, and was demolished in 1978 because it
was falling down and unsafe.
HP289: of all the jetties in the Redlands, this one was the most well-known. It was built
on Cleveland Point in 1887 by the Queensland Government to replace the 1866 jetty.
Photos of this jetty were used for postcards like this one. This photo was taken about 1914

Cleveland Jetty

 

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