Ming Tombs Beijing China

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ming_Dynasty_Tombs

The Ming Dynasty Tombs (Chinese: 明十三陵; pinyin: Míng shísān líng; literally “Thirteen Tombs of the Ming Dynasty”) are located some 42 kilometers north-northwest of central Beijing, within the suburban Changping District of Beijing municipality. The site, located on the southern slope of Tianshou Mountain (originally Mount Huangtu), was chosen on the feng shui principles by the third Ming Dynasty emperor Yongle (1402–1424), who moved the capital of China from Nanjing to its the present location in Beijing. He is credited with envisioning the layout of the Ming-era Beijing as well as a number of landmarks and monuments located therein. After the construction of the Imperial Palace (the Forbidden City) in 1420, the Yongle Emperor selected his burial site and created his own mausoleum.

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The site of the Ming Dynasty Imperial Tombs was carefully chosen according to Feng Shui (geomancy) principles. According to these, bad spirits and evil winds descending from the North must be deflected; therefore, an arc-shaped area at the foot of the Jundu Mountains north of Beijing was selected. This 40 square kilometer area — enclosed by the mountains in a pristine, quiet valley full of dark earth, tranquil water and other necessities as per Feng Shui — would become the necropolis of the Ming Dynasty.

Main Court at Ming Tombs

The timber is solid sandalwood from one tree……in the Main Building of Ming Tombs

A seven kilometer road named the “Spirit Way” (Shéndào) leads into the complex, lined with statues of guardian animals and officials, with a front gate consisting of a three-arches, painted red, and called the “Great Red Gate”. The Spirit Way, or Sacred Way, starts with a huge stone memorial archway lying at the front of the area. Constructed in 1540, during the Ming Dynasty, this archway is one of the biggest stone archways in China today.

Farther in, the Shengong Shengde Stele Pavilion can be seen. Inside it, there is a 50-ton tortoise shaped dragon-beast carrying a stone tablet. This was added during Qing times and was not part of the original Ming layout. Four white marble Huabiao (pillars of glory) are positioned at each corner of the stele pavilion. At the top of each pillar is a mythical beast. Then come two Pillars on each side of the road, whose surfaces are carved with the cloud design, and tops are shaped like a rounded cylinder. They are of a traditional design and were originally beacons to guide the soul of the deceased, The road leads to 18 pairs of stone statues of mythical animals, which are all sculpted from whole stones and larger than life size, leading to a three-arched gate known as the Dragon and Phoenix Gate.

At present, only three tombs are open to the public. There have been no excavations since 1989, but plans for new archeological research and further opening of tombs have circulated. They can be seen on Google earth: Chang Ling, the largest (40°18′5.16″N 116°14′35.45″E); Ding Ling, whose underground palace has been excavated (40°17′42.43″N 116°12′58.53″E); and Zhao Ling.

Carving at the entrance to the first building
Carving at the entrance to the first building
Statue of the Emperor
Statue of the Emperor

 

The thirteenth Tomb was opened and the treasures removed for display. This crown is made of solid gold with two dragons on either side
The thirteenth Tomb was opened and the treasures removed for display. This crown is made of solid gold with two dragons on either side
Empress Crown of blue
Empress Crown of blue

 

Gold was used as currency in varied sized ingots
Gold was used as currency in varied sized ingots

 

Solid Gold items
Old twisted trees outside the Tomb
Old twisted trees outside the Tomb
Map of the tomb..this tour only took us to the first building
Map of the tomb..this tour only took us to the first building

 

Trees with the Main Building behind at Ming Tomb
Trees with the Main Building behind at Ming Tomb

Published by ladymaggic

Artist, Traveller, Researcher and Writer, currently living on the waterfront, Ooncooncoon Bay, Russell Island., where I photograph daily sunrises, sunsets and the Moon, as well as the changing colours and lights of the Bay and those who use it...the ferries, yachts, boats and the wild life... Travel photos and videos about many places in Australia​

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